Occupational injuries

in

LA7As in the two previous years, also in 2011 there were no fatal occupational injuries. The total number of injuries was in line with 2010. The injury rate shows limited fluctuations over time, while the absentee rate confirmed the downward trend. There were no hours of absence attributable to occupational disease, since – according to the official list – the kind of work performed at Terna is not associated with the possible onset of professional diseases. Therefore, the occupational disease rate at Terna should always be considered zero.

No fatal occupational injuries were recorded nor cases of fatal or serious injuries – even ones that occurred in previous years – for which in the three-year period considered it was definitively established that the company was in any way responsible. In 2011, no injuries occurred to Terna female workers.

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES, TERNA EMPLOYEES GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS (1) (2)
  2011 2010 2009
Injury Rate 1,67 1,74 1,24
Lost Day Rate 46,4 65,0 40,9
Absentee Rate (2) 7.757,0 7.796,5 8.219,4
Occupational Diseases Rate 0 0 0
Number of injuries 49 50 36
- serious 1 2 0
- fatal 0 0 0

 

(1) As required by the GRI protocols, the definitions adopted are those of the International Labour Organization (ILO). To facilitate comparison with other sources, the following notes provide the values of the same indicators calculated according to alternative formulas. It was not considered necessary to further break down the figures at the regional level, because Terna operates only in Italy. The injury rate is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 working weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). According to the latter calculation, the injury rate was 8.3 in 2011, 8.7 in 2010, and 6.2 in 2009. The lost day rate is the ratio between the number of days not worked because of injury and the number of hours worked during the year multiplied by 200,000. Days not worked are calendar days and are counted from when the injury occurred. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000. According to this way of doing the calculation, the lost day rate was 0.2 in 2011, 0.3 in 2010, 0.2 in 2009. The absentee rate is the number of days of absence because of illness, injury, or strike out of the number of days worked in the same period multiplied by 200,000. To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated as a percentage of the days worked. According to this way of doing the calculation, the absentee rate was 3.9 in 2011, 3.9 in 2010, 4.1 in 2009. The occupational disease rate is the total number of cases of occupational disease divided by the number of hours worked in the year, multiplied by 200,000. (2) In 2011, processing criteria were revised and the items determining the total of hours worked. In order to guarantee coherence and comparison of data, the figures of hours worked were updated and revised that were also used in the previous years (2010 and 2009) for calculating injury and absentee rates; for this reason, data published in the table are different with respect to the data published in the previous years. (3) The reasons for absence considered do not include maternity leave, marriage leave, study leave, leave for union activities, other cases of paid leave, and suspensions.

In 2010, Terna consolidated its internal procedures for reporting injuries of employees of contractors and subcontractors, monitoring all the construction sites and recording all kinds of injuries (instead of only fatal and serious ones, which had been duly presented in the previous editions of the Sustainability Report). As in the case of Terna’s employees, in 2011 and 2010 there were no fatal injuries among the employees of contractors and subcontractors.

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES OF CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS EMPLOYEES GRI-ILO DEFINITIONS
  2011 2010 2009
IOccupational injuries 13 14 n.a.
- serious 4 5 1
- fatal 0 0 1
Injury Rate (1) 0.75 0.85 n.a.
(1) This is the number of injuries with at least one day’s abstention from work divided by the number of hours worked during the year and multiplied by 200,000 (corresponding to 50 work weeks x 40 hours x 100 employees). To facilitate comparison with other sources, this indicator was also calculated using a multiplication factor of 1,000,000 instead of 200,000 (consequently obtaining an injury rate five times that of the ILO). According to the latter calculation, the injury rate was 3.7 in 2011 and 4.2 in 2010.